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FALL 2010 CATALOG

When the Danube Ran Red

 
Zsuzsanna Ozsváth

With a Foreword by David Patterson

Cloth $17.95    |    978-0-8156-0980-3    |    2010


ebook 978-0-8156-5110-9

Reviews
"Opening with the ominous scene of one young schoolgirl whispering an urgent account of Nazi horror to another over birthday cake, Ozsváth’s memoir tells the story of her childhood in Hungary, living under the threat of the Holocaust. The setting is the summer of 1944 in Budapest during the time of the German occupation, when the Jews were confined to ghetto houses but not transported to Auschwitz in boxcars, as was the rest of the Hungarian Jewry living in the countryside. Provided with food and support by their former nanny, Erzsi, Ozsváth’s family stays in a ghetto house where a group of children play theater, tell stories to one another, invent games to pass time, and wait for liberation. In the fall of that year, however, things take a turn for the worse. Rounded up under horrific circumstances, forced to go on death marches, and shot on the banks of the Danube by the thousands, the Jews of Budapest are threatened with immediate destruction. Ozsváth and her family survive because of Erzsi’s courage and humanity. Cheating the watching eyes of the murderers, she brings them food and runs with them from house to house under heavy bombardment in the streets. Ozsváth has written extensively about Holocaust literature and the Holocaust in Hungary. When the Danube Ran Red combines a grounding in Hungarian history with the pathos of a survivor and the eloquence of a poet."
—Jewish Book Council

Zsuzsanna Ozsvath’s new book is set in her homeland of Hungary, where her family lived under constant threat of the Holocaust. In 1944, residents in Budapest might have considered themselves lucky; while German occupiers confined Jews to ghetto houses, they didn’t send them off to Auschwitz, which was the fate of rural Hungarian Jewry. But in the fall of 1944, all that changed. Urban Jews were forced to go on death marches and shot on the banks of the Danube by the thousands. Only because of the courage and humanity of the family’s former nanny, Erzsi, did Zsuzsanna’s family survive. The author teaches Holocaust Studies and the history of ideas at the University of Texas, Dallas.
www.HistoryWire.com

"Riveting—a vividly drawn, acutely perceptive self-portrait of harrowing, but also courageous, life-affirming experiences. This is not one more memoir by an aging survivor but a work of high literary merit and historical consequence."
—Alvin H. Rosenfeld, author of A Double Dying: Reflections on Holocaust Literature

Description
Opening with the ominous scene of one young schoolgirl whispering an urgent account of Nazi horror to another over birthday cake, Ozsváth’s extraordinary and chilling memoir tells the story of her childhood in Hungary, living under the threat of the Holocaust. The setting is the summer of 1944 in Budapest during the time of the German occupation, when the Jews were confined to ghetto houses but not transported to Auschwitz in boxcars, as was the rest of the Hungarian Jewry living in the countryside. Provided with food and support by their former nanny, Erzsi, Ozsváth’s family stays in a ghetto house where a group of children play theater, tell stories to one another, invent games to pass time, and wait for liberation.

In the fall of that year, however, things take a turn for the worse. Rounded up under horrific circumstances, forced to go on death marches, and shot on the banks of the Danube by the thousands, the Jews of Budapest are threatened with immediate destruction. Ozsváth and her family survive because of Erzsi’s courage and humanity. Cheating the watching eyes of the murderers, she brings them food and runs with them from house to house under heavy bombardment in the streets.

As a scholar, critic, and translator, Ozsváth has written extensively about Holocaust literature and the Holocaust in Hungary. Now, she records her own history in this clear-eyed, moving account. When the Danube Ran Red combines an exceptional grounding in Hungarian history with the pathos of a survivor and the eloquence of a poet to present a truly singular work.

View other books in the Religion, Theology, and the Holocaust series

Author
Zsuzsanna Ozsváth is the Leah and Paul Lewis Chair of Holocaust Studies and professor of literature and history of ideas at the University of Texas, Dallas. She is the author of several books and an award-winning poetry translator. Her publications include In the Footsteps of Orpheus: The Life and Times of Miklós Radnóti, and Foamy Sky: The Major Poems of Miklós Radnóti (with Fred Turner), and The Iron-Blue Vault: Selected Poems of Atilla Jozsef (with Fred Turner).

5 1/2 x 8 1/2, 184 pages, 7 black-and-white illustrations, notes


When the Danube Ran Red

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